Resources

We want to help you design and deliver training programs that meet the needs of employers, workers, and the community.

These resources will help!

 

LABOR MARKET RESOURCES

Successful Career Plathways depend on accurate labor market information at the local, regional, and national levels. When we build a Pathway within a career-technical program or occupational field, we gather a wide range of data, including:

  • Occupations 

    What are the major job titles within the industry? How do they progress? Which ones are entry level, middle-management, and senior positions? How do workers move from one position to the next — by seniority, industry certifications, academic advancement, or other measures? These are the building blocks for your initial Pathways map.

    • Favorite resources:  Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) and the US Department of Labor’s O*NET provide occupational information based on SOC (Standard Occupational Codes) that are consistent in any occupational data search.
    • State employment websites like the Oregon Employment Department can give you more specific data on occupations, usually at the county or even the metropolitan region (e.g., Portland, Las Angeles, Chicago). These sites may also indicate which occupations are growing or in demand and which ones are trending down or disappearing over the next 5-10 years.
  •  Industry Certifications

    In many industries, workers progress through a career path by earning industry-recognized certifications.  These are generally third-party credentials, awarded based on a combination of demonstrated skills, written exams and/or time on the job. As educational institutions develop Career Pathways, it is important to learn about what certifications are recognized and/or required by local and regional employers and incorporate their outcomes within the CTE programs whenever possible.  The college testing centers may also consider offering testing opportunities for exams, and where feasible, faculty may choose to become certified administrators as well.

    • Favorite resources:  Local employers are the best source for this information. In addition, a search within the occupational field for “industry-recognized certifications” will yield the names of certifying entities, often industry associations or product manufacturers.
    • One of the best sources for Manufacturing-related certifications, for example, is the National Association of Manufacturers  (NAM) and their non-profit training center, the Manufacturing Institute.
  • Post-Secondary Institution Websites

    What are the colleges and universities promoting about their courses and programs? Are there only 2 or 4-year degrees within an occupational field, or are there smaller certificates or training programs available for entry-level or mid-level positions? Are there articulation agreements in place and promoted between community college and university programs? Does all the training being offered apply to a completion credential (e.g., degree, certificate)? Are the courses for credit or non-credit? This makes a difference when students first take the non-credit option and then have to repeat the course for credit if they want to earn a degree later on.

    • Favorite resources:  I’m particularly interested in the department or program pages related to the Pathway occupations. How do they present the information to students? How easy is it to navigate, both for students and employers?  When I do a Search on the homepage of the college website, for example, can I quickly and easily find information on the degree, certificate or training options, or am I sent to a PDF of the college catalog.
    • In Oregon, community colleges have partnered with the Oregon Employment Department to include Career Pathways maps and college program information for many occupations.  Go to www.qualityinfo.org, for example, and select Occupation & Wage Information under Jobs & Careers. Type in “Welding” and you will get an Occupational Report for Welders, Cutters, Solderers, and Brazers (SOC 514121). Scroll through the wealth of information on wages, hiring trends, current openings, skill sets, and training opportunities until you come to Career Pathways for this occupation. Click on some of the roadmaps to see how colleges are presenting a wide range of occupational information visually through this advising tool.
  • Workforce Development Options

    Community colleges are generally not the only ones providing training in occupational fields within a region. It pays to check out both the for-profit training centers/colleges and local workforce development entities (often called WorkSource Centers) that may have short-term, usually non-credit, training programs. Some K-12 school districts have career technical training centers that serve both high school and older youth and may or may not articulate to the community college programs in the area. These workforce partners provide opportunities to build a wider, more connected Pathways training web that better serves students, employers, and the local community.

    • Favorite resources: Begin by learning more about the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, commonly referred to as WIOA. It is the most recent version of workforce development funding, administered through the US Department of Labor’s Employment and Training Administration (DOL-ETA), in coordination with the US Departments of Education and Health and Human Services.
    • Generally, every county or region in every state has a local WIOA Board that directs the way funds are used to build and maintain a strong workforce. Through local centers, individuals access a variety of federal and state support funds for training and job search services. While some partner with local colleges to provide occupational training, many develop their own training programs in response to employer needs. Find out what’s happening in your region and build connections where you can.
    • Learn more about for-profit colleges in the region. What programs do they offer, and what are their completion and placement rates in the community? Do they provide high-quality training that might fill a gap in the community college programs? Can articulation agreements be crafted to allow students to students to earn degrees? Recognize that students — and employers — have options in where they obtain training in an occupational field. Building a more comprehensive Pathway means including all education and workforce development options.

PUBLICATIONS

 These articles, reports, and texts by Dr. Eileen Casey White (President, Connections Consulting Inc.) and colleagues are generally available for your reference. You can do a search online or send us an email (eileen@ecwconnections.com) and we’ll let you know if a copy is available.

NOTE: Some documents are proprietary and may not be distributed.

BOOKS & MANUALS

Casey White, E. (1997). An Examination of Community College Workplace Instructor Perspectives. Ann Arbor, MI: UMI Publications.

Casey White, E. (2007). Blueprint for a Pathway. Chemeketa Community College, Salem, OR.

Pemberton, C. & Casey White, E. (2013). “Women, Sport, and Adult Education: Shortchanging Women and Girls.” In Learning with Adults: A Reader (Peter Mayo, Ed.) Sense Publishers.

Pemberton, C., Akkary, R., Beegle, D., Casey White, E., Gatimu, W., & Musser, M. (2012). Getting There: Women’s Journeys to and Through Educational Attainment. Sense Publishers.

Beegle, D. (Casey White, E., co-editor) (2010).  Action Approach Guidebook. Communication Across Barriers: Portland, OR.

PROFESSIONAL ARTICLES / INDUSTRY PUBLICATIONS

Casey White, E. (2011). “Supporting Laid-Off Colleagues,” Chemeketa Community College Classified Association Newsletter, September 2011. 

Casey White, E. (1998). “Trends in Workplace Teaching,” ORTESOL (Oregon Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages) Newsletter, Vol. 20, No. 2, Spring 1998.

Theis, A. and Casey White, E. (2014). Computer-Aided Design and Drafting (CADD) Pathways in the Florida TRADE Regions. A labor market study and report for a 12-member consortium of community and technical colleges in Florida, in partnership with Key Links, Inc.

Theis, A. and Casey White, E. (2014). Industrial Maintenance Pathways in the Florida TRADE Regions. A labor market study and report for a 12-member consortium of community and technical colleges in Florida, in partnership with Key Links, Inc.

Theis, A. and Casey White, E. (2014). Machinist Pathways in the Florida TRADE Regions. A labor market study and report for a 12-member consortium of community and technical colleges in Florida, in partnership with Key Links, Inc.

Theis, A. and Casey White, E. (2014). Quality Pathways in the Florida TRADE Regions. A labor market study and report for a 12-member consortium of community and technical colleges in Florida, in partnership with Key Links, Inc.

Theis, A. and Casey White, E. (2014). Welding Pathways in the Florida TRADE Regions. A labor market study and report for a 12-member consortium of community and technical colleges in Florida, in partnership with Key Links, Inc.

Theis, A. and Casey White, E. (2013). An Urgent Call to Action in Support of Manufacturing, South Central Kentucky / Barren River Region: Opportunity Knocks! A research study and report for the Warren County Chamber of Commerce, in partnership with Key Links, Inc.

Theis, A. and Casey White, E. (2011). Towards a Renaissance of Manufacturing Education in North Carolina: Are we ready? A research study and report on the state of manufacturing programs in 58 North Carolina community colleges; developed in coordination with North Carolina Community College System, in partnership with Key Links, Inc.

Casey White, E. (2006). Agricultural Skills and Career Ladders. An industry study and report for the Farmworkers Institute for Education and Leadership Development.

Casey White, E. (2004). Maintenance Compensation Survey: Northwest Food and Dairy Industries. An industry study and report for the Northwest Food Processors Association.

Casey White, E. (2004) Tillamook County Creamery Association (TCCA) Job Descriptions Project. 60+ job descriptions and succession-planning recommendations developed for the TCCA.

Casey White, E. (2003). Manufacturing Cluster Research Summary. A summary and analysis of current practices and policies related to manufacturing clusters, prepared for the Commissioner, Oregon Community Colleges & Workforce Development.

Casey White, E. (2002). Ammonia Refrigeration Training Guide. An industry training guide developed as part of a partnership with Steaming Kettle Consulting and the Oregon Economic and Community Development Department (OECDD) for the food processing industry.

Casey White, E. (2002). Job Description Core Competency Revision. A job analysis project and summary report developed for the Tillamook County Creamery Association (TCCA).

Casey White, E. (2000). Oregon Cross Industry Project. Researcher, project manager, and author of the Executive and Full reports, http://www.odccwd.state.or.us/workforcepartners/skills/cross_industry.htm.

EDUCATION AND WORKFORCE REPORTS / PUBLICATIONS

Casey White, E. (2013) State Energy Sector Partnership Oregon Green Technician Certificate Sustainability Report.  Facilitated the development process and produced the report for the Oregon Green Technician Consortium (11 rural community colleges and The Oregon Consortium-Oregon Workforce Alliance).

Casey White, E. (2008, February). Three-to-Four Credit Conversion Policy Considerations. A survey of Oregon community college policies, practices, and recommendations for implementing the process of changing Humanities and Social Science courses from 3 to 4 credits.

Casey White, E. (2005, March). Customizing Pathways for College Success: SUMCO Final Report. Summary of layoff/retraining program developed and managed by Eileen Casey White and Chemeketa staff in partnership with the Enterprise for Employment & Education and SUMCO.

Casey White, E. (2014). Oregon Department of Transportation Title VI, Workforce Development, and Small Business Program Transition Plan, Phases 1-4.  A research study and series of reports, recommendations, and models for realignment of civil rights functions and federal funding compliance requirements among highway, transit, and rail divisions.

Casey White, E. (2009). WorkSource Oregon Pathways Training series. A 36-hour, nine-session training on Career Pathways components developed for regional One-Stop Centers.

Casey White, E. (2006). Oregon Community College Environmental Scan.  Survey and analysis of workforce and economic development partnerships of 17 Oregon community colleges, developed for the Oregon Department of Community Colleges and Workforce Development.

Casey White, E. (2006). Oregon Community College Environmental Scan (updated).  Survey and analysis of workforce and economic development partnerships of 17 Oregon community colleges, developed for the Oregon Department of Community Colleges and Workforce Development.

Casey White, E. (2003). Cluster Research Overview. Summary of current research and recommendations for agency focus, developed for the Oregon Department of Community Colleges and Workforce Development.

Tonkin, L. & Casey White, E. (2002). PIA Skill Standards Validation Plan, PIA Skill Standards Development & Utilization Compliance Plan. Developed in partnership with The Mackey Group for the California Department of Corrections.

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